fbpx

STREET TALK: Fitzmaurice St, Wagga Wagga

Hi I’m Michelle Wilcox from PRD Nationwide. Welcome to first ever episode of “Street Talk”.

We’re here on one of Wagga’s earliest streets, Fitzmaurice Street, and we’re going to have a bit of a look around.

Fitzmaurice Street was one of the original streets in Wagga, and the Colonial Surveyor General named it after his First Lieutenant, John Fitzmaurice, whom he served with during the Peninsular War.

Anyone who’s a real Wagga local will know Romano’s on the corner of Fitzmaurice and Sturt Street. It was originally built as The Commercial in 1857, and was one of the most substantial buildings in town. It was originally occupied by the RAAF during World War II, and then purchased by Azzalin Orlando Romano, who owned Romano’s in Sydney. He remodeled it into a pub and called it Romano’s and sold it in ’66, but it remains Romano’s today.

The original court house building floated away in the 1852-53 floods, and now the court house has moved to its present site. It’s a landmark building, and it’s located on a prominent street corner of Fitzmaurice and Sturt Street.

Hunters on the Hill moved to this location in 1872, and it basically hasn’t changed and hasn’t moved since it was first there, apart from a few variations in what it sold. Back in the day, it would have books, stationary, and other things like seeds and medicines. Today it still has office supplies, it’s a news agency, and it also has a beautiful gift store.

The architectural face of the main street has changed constantly, but there is still the chance of an occasional glimpse of roof lines from decades past.

One of the most exciting things about Fitzmaurice Street is its age and its architecture. We’re in front of the old Commercial Bank, which was opened in 1882, and it now houses PRD Nationwide.

If you’ve got any more information on any of the history of the buildings of Fitzmaurice Street, I’d love to hear from you. Give me a call on 0414 399 961.